CMIT participates in Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation community-based fundraiser
The Center for Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics joined the New England Chapter of Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation for their annual spin4 crohn’s and colitis cures fundraiser
How industrialized life remodels the microbiome
A new study from an MIT-led team has revealed that these bacterial populations can remake themselves within the lifetime of their host, by passing genes back and forth.
Development of a Covalent Inhibitor of Gut Bacterial Bile Salt Hydrolases
To better understand the pathologic impact of intestinal bile acids on host health, CMIT faculty designed a non-toxic inhibitor that reduces secondary bile acid production in the intestine to better understand the impact of these metabolites.
Gut Microbiota Composition and Functional Changes in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Authors unveil a large-scale metagenomic microbiome analysis from patients with both Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
Predictive Metabolomic Profiling of Microbial Communities Using Amplicon or Metagenomic Sequences
Researchers create a novel computer model that predicts the metabolic activity of new microbial communities using widely available metagenomic sequencing.
Functional Heterogeneity in the Fermentation Capabilities of the Healthy Human Gut Microbiota
A new study by Gurry and fellow CMIT colleagues explores the relationship between fiber intake and microbial Short Chain Fatty Acid production
Synthetic Gene Circuits Enable Systems-Level Biosensor Trigger Discovery at the Host-Microbe Interface
Engineered microbes with condition-responsive circuits can be used to record physiological and environmental conditions as they pass through the gut.
Akkermansia Muciniphila Induces Intestinal Adaptive Immune Responses during Homeostasis
A common intestinal commensal bacteria induces T cell-dependent immunoglobulin production during periods of homeostasis, uncovering a novel pathway through which the microbiome may contribute to immune dysregulation and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.
Pathway Paradigms Revealed from the Genetics of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
In a recently published paper in Nature, CMIT faculty provide a comprehensive review of the scientific advances that have brought us to our current understanding of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) pathophysiology.
Growth Effects of N-acylethanolamines on Gut Bacteria Reflect Altered Bacterial Abundances in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Researchers identify a specific lipid metabolite that is abnormally abundant in IBD patients. Their subsequent investigations reveal how this metabolite stimulates the growth of species that are well established to be overrepresented in IBD patients.